Tubal Ligation Surgeons San Dimas CA

If you look in any history textbook or historical social study, you will find that the role of women in most cultures was shockingly basic. All a woman was supposed to do was take care of a house and husband and have children to carry on the family name.

Alaa M Abdellatif, MD
(626) 857-1992
130 W Route 66
Glendora, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Alexandria, Fac Of Med, Alexandria, Egypt (330-03 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Douglas Wilkins Blayney, MD
(626) 335-0213
210 S Grand Ave Ste 402
Glendora, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Diego, Sch Of Med, La Jolla Ca 92093
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
Behnam I Ebrahimi, MD
(909) 865-9960
1910 Royalty Dr
Pomona, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Uri Martin Zisblatt, MD
(310) 419-8353
210 W San Bernardino Rd
Covina, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Swarna Sundari Chanduri
(909) 630-7205
1910 Royalty Dr
Pomona, CA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Linda Diana Bosserman, MD
(909) 949-2242
210 S Grand Ave Ste 402
Glendora, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Hematology-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Stanford Univ Sch Of Med, Stanford Ca 94305
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Gargi H Upadhyaya
(626) 335-0213
210 S Grand Ave
Glendora, CA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Uri Martin Zisblatt
(626) 915-6280
210 West San Bernardino Road
Covina, CA
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
David Chiaont Khan, MD
(310) 419-8353
210 W San Bernardino Rd
Covina, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Herbert L Duvivier, MD
(909) 620-5505
350 Vinton Ave Ste 101
Pomona, CA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
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Tubal Ligation

If you look in any history textbook or historical social study, you will find that the role of women in most cultures was shockingly basic. All a woman was supposed to do was take care of a house and husband and have children to carry on the family name. Well, now women have professions, and sometimes a woman's lifestyle doesn't include the wish to have children.

Thus, women who are absolutely sure that they do not want to become mothers at any point in their lives often choose to have tubal ligation done. What is tubal ligation? It is a procedure in which a woman has her fallopian tubes blocked off surgically. This is also referred to as "having the tubes tied".

Usually, the tubal ligation procedure is done permanently. It is not only done on women who have never had children. Indeed, sometimes this procedure is done on women who have had all of the children they wanted to have, and now want to be assured that they will not have any more.

If a woman is thinking about having a tubal ligation, they have to take into consideration that their situation will probably change down the line. For example, they might be certain that they don't want children right now, but they certainly don't want to be in a position where the time is right for them to have children, and they physically no longer can.

So, that leads potential patients of this procedure to wonder whether or not it can be undone. Luckily for them, the answer is yes…usually. Sometimes this procedure cannot be undone, especially if a woman wants to have a tubal reversal years after she had her tubes tied. Thus, this procedure should really not be done as only a temporary birth control method.

The procedure itself can be performed under local anesthesia via an epidural, or general anesthesia can be used. It really all depends on the preference of the patient. Of course, this procedure cannot take place without first scheduling a consultation, in which previous medical history will be discussed.

If a woman has any doubts at all over having her tubes tied, then that is a clear enough indication for her not to have it done. There are other ways to prevent pregnancy, as everyone knows, so why do some women choose to get their tubes tied?

The answer has a lot to do with birth control pills, which, aside from abstinence, is the most common method of birth control. Birth control pills are indeed incredibly effective, but they come along with a myriad of side effects. Most annoying to women is that of water retention. A woman who is on "the pill" might feel continually bloated, and even experience significant weight gain.

Other options include vaginal rings, which provide low doses of hormones to kill sperm before it reaches the uterus. Also spermicide can be used in conjunction with condoms. Bottom line: if a woman doesn't want to get pregnant, that doesn't mean she has to have surgery to prevent pregnancy.

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