Preparation for a Tubal Reversal Dallas TX

When a woman is actively having sex and does not wish to get pregnant, then she uses a form of birth control. However, if she is using other medication, like the kind of medication that is prescribed to people who are suffering from seizures or antibiotic medication, then the birth control can sometimes not be as effective.

Carolyn M Matthews, MD
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Sammons Cancer Center Gynecologic Oncology
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Dallas, TX
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Claude Andrew Denham
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(214) 820-1800
3409 Worth St Ste 600
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Preparation for a Tubal Reversal

When a woman is actively having sex and does not wish to get pregnant, then she uses a form of birth control. However, if she is using other medication, like the kind of medication that is prescribed to people who are suffering from seizures or antibiotic medication, then the birth control can sometimes not be as effective.

So, some women decide that it is better to have their fallopian tubes surgically blocked, since there is always the option of having a tubal reversal, right? Not necessarily. In order to have a successful tubal reversal procedure, it is important to first understand the anatomy behind "having one's tube's tied".

Some people think that the entire process of getting pregnant is straightforward – a couple has unprotected sex, and a pregnancy occurs. However, pregnancy is more complicated than that, and it is no wonder that children are thought of as a miracle!

Specifically, the sperm has to swim up through the fallopian tubes, meet with the egg (while beating out hundreds of other sperm to do so) fertilize the egg, and the newly fertilized egg has to implant itself in the uterus. Women initially choose to have their tubes blocked for this very reason.

There are many different reasons why a woman might choose that the time is right to have tubal reversal. Perhaps before she was in a relationship with someone who she knew she was not ready to have kids with, and now she's in a stable, healthy relationship.

Or, perhaps she was not in the right financial situation, and is now, which makes it a much better time to start having children. Whatever the reason, it is important for the woman to understand the technical aspects of tubal reversal, as well as her chances of successfully becoming pregnant after the procedure.

The amount of success will partially have to do with how long ago the woman initially had her tubes tied. If it was quite a long time ago, then the chances are higher that the subsequent procedure would not be affective. The same outcome would happen if the woman is at least in her forties.

Thus, the perfect outcome could be achieved for a woman no older than her mid-thirties. The procedure itself involves outpatient surgery, in which only a local anesthesia is used. Specifically, the doctor uses a microscope and intricate tools to unblock the fallopian tubes.

How long after the procedure should it take before she becomes pregnant? Ideally, it should be no more than three months. However, sometimes there are complications during the surgery in which the fallopian tubes simply cannot be unblocked.

Thus, for women who have an unsuccessful outcome, there are still ways that they can have children. For example, they can have in-vitro fertilization, artificial insemination, or they could hire a surrogate. Adoption is also an option if none of the other methods work. However, whatever happens, it is important to know that a woman's dream of becoming a mother can most assuredly come true.

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