Labiaplasty Pictures Mound MN

Labiaplasty is a surgical procedure that reduces or reshapes the labia minora, the skin that covers the female clitoris and vaginal opening. The purpose of a labiaplasty is to define the inner labia, the urethral opening is redefined, and improvements can be made to the vagina.

Labiaplasty Pictures

Labiaplasty is a surgical procedure that reduces or reshapes the labia minora, the skin that covers the female clitoris and vaginal opening. The purpose of a labiaplasty is to define the inner labia, the urethral opening is redefined, and improvements can be made to the vagina. Problems with the labia can be caused by genetics, sexual intercourse or difficulties in childbirth. If you are considering a labiaplasty, your cosmetic surgeon will have before and after pictures of other women who have had to have the surgery so that you can see what a difference it can make.

Labia Minora (inner lips) Reduction

If you have a large protuberant appearing labia minora and are embarrassed or experience irritation when wearing pants, surgical labial reduction can greatly improve the aesthetic appearance of the abnormally enlarged labia.

Labia Majora (outer lips) Reduction

This common anatomical variation may be worsened by childbirth or by weight gain or loss. Large or uneven vaginal lips can cause pain, hygiene problems and embarrassment. They may sometimes be improved by liposuction. In more severe cases, surgical reduction is necessary.

The length of surgery is between 1 to 2 hours. Labiaplasty is an outpatient procedure usually performed under local anesthesia. After surgery you may experience some mild discomfort and swelling, which usually disappears completely after 1-2 weeks. Labial incisions usually heal and are rarely noticeable.

You should not have this surgery if you:

• Are pregnant or menstruating

• Have complications from an episiotomy

• Have a yeast infection or genital herpes outbreak

• Have problems with bladder incontinence

• Have a prolapsed uterus (your uterus has fallen

into the vaginal canal)

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